sectblog1

Thursday, 01 August 2019 20:13

Edward F. Corson

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Visitors to our headquarters these past few weeks might have noticed a change to our meeting room.

meeting room

The archivist has taken over.

In the summer, our programs tend to move outside to the cemetery taking advantage of longer days and warmer weather. Rather than let all that space go to waste, I moved the Corson family papers in. I have three more weeks to get it all foldered, boxed, and described.

Processing a collection like this is the meat and potatoes of archival work, and it’s fascinating to dig (sometimes in a very literal way) into people’s lives. The papers came to us from the Corson family when they sold the Maple Hill property, right on the border of Plymouth and Whitemarsh townships. They were created by three generations of Corsons – Dr. Hiram Corson, his son Dr. Joseph K. Corson, and his grandson, Dr. Edward F. Corson. I’ve wrote about Joseph a few weeks ago, so today I’ll focus on Edward.

blog438

Dr. Edward F. Corson in the army during World War I

Edward was born in 1883, the second child of Joseph and Ada Corson. His father was a U.S. Army surgeon and the family moved around to various posts in the West and the South. He was born in Missouri and educated at the Friends’ School in Washington, D.C. while his father was stationed there. In 1895, he enrolled at Germantown Academy while his father was stationed in Wyoming.

doc04732120190801152649 001

Don't worry, later letters show Edward enjoying his time at Germantown Academy.

doc04732220190801153001 001

After graduating in 1901, he went into the family trade, becoming a doctor. He specialized in dermatology. As a young man, Edward traveled quite a bit. We have some letters he wrote to his parents from the White Star Line’s SS “Arabic.” He even traveled to the Far East. 

doc04732320190801155331 001

In 1917, Edward married Esther Bisler in Chicago and served in World War I. They had two children and lived in Philadelphia and Lower Merion before eventually settling at the family home, Maple Hill. He died in 1967.

doc04732420190801155902 001  doc04732520190801155941 001

Read 183 times Last modified on Thursday, 01 August 2019 20:40