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Thursday, 03 October 2019 19:18

Montgomery County’s own jaguar hunter

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This morning I got an email from the Academy of Natural Sciences about Sasha Siemel, a big game hunter who lived in Montgomery County for much of his life. I had never heard of him, so I set out to discover more.

Well, it was easy. He has his own Wikipedia page, which we all know means he was SOMEBODY. He was born in Riga, Latvia and came to the United States in 1907 at the age of 17. After only two years, this restless guy went down to Argentina where he worked in a print shop for several years, before moving on to Brazil in 1914. There he worked at the diamond mine camps in Mato Grosso as a mechanic. There a native Brazilian taught him how to hunt for jaguars using only a seven-foot spear.

Siemel obit

Sasha had found his life’s calling. He worked for the local ranchers clearing the area of jaguars. He was quoted in the Times-Herald, “I hunt the tiger only on or near ranches, where he is a nuisance – never in his habitat. He has a purpose there.”

The rest of the world soon heard of his adventures. In 1929, author Julian Duguid hired Siemel as a guide on a trip across Pantanal (a huge tropical wetland). Duguid later wrote a book about the trip, Green Hell, and later a biography of Siemel, Tiger Man. Siemel took to writing himself, penning articles for outdoor magazines (including National Geographic). In 1930 he took part in a University of Pennsylvania expedition to Brazil.

Jungle Menace 1937 promotional photo

Siemel is on the right

While on a lecture tour in 1937, he met Edith Bray in Philadelphia. The two eventually married and began their family in the Brazilian jungle. Around the time he met Edith, Sasha appeared in a movie serial called Jungle Menace as a character named “Tiger Van Dorn.”

In 1947, the couple moved to Pennsylvania, buying an 18th century farmhouse in Marlborough Township in 1947. In the comfort of home, Siemel wrote his autobiography, Tigero. The book was to be made into a movie, with John Wayne and Ave Gardner and shot on location, but it fell through (that story is told in a documentary called Tigero: A Film That Was Never Made). The Siemels brought not only their three children who had been born in Brazil, but many of animals, too, including an anaconda.

Jungle Menace 1937 film poster 02

In 1963, Siemel bought the old Perkiomen Rolling Mills building in Perkiomenville and opened a museum for his various collections and hunting trophies. A researcher visiting the Historical Society this morning remembered the museum well. Ardythe (Hersh) Musselman grew up in Marlborough Township and went to school with Sasha Siemel, Jr. She remembers Sasha, Sr. coming to school with a large reel of film of one of his Brazilian adventures.   She also remembered the disturbing noises made by the family’s peacocks.

Sasha Siemel died in 1970 at the age of 80. His obituary claims he killed 300 jaguars. The museum and gift shop closed soon after. The mill was later purchased by someone who sought to turn it into a home, but the building caught fire in 1993 and, while it’s still standing, it was rendered uninhabitable. It can still be seen at the junction of Gravel Pike and Upper Ridge Road in Perkiomenville.

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