sectblog1

Karen Ploch, Curator

Thursday, 09 July 2020 13:32

Dettra Flag Co.

Can you identify these objects? Here's a hint, the manufacture's name "Dettra" is engraved on each item. 

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Dettra was a flag company based in Oaks, Pennsylvania. John Dettra founded the company in 1902. The company made flags, pennants, banners, bannerettes, and flag accessories.1 So what are these two mystery items at HSMC...flag holders for your car! Believed to have been made around the mid 1900s, these metal items were designed to attach to your car's bumper and hold a small flag.

The flag business appears to eb and flow depending on current events. For example, when the United States added a star to the flag when Alaska became a state in 1959, Dettra saw a huge uptick in orders for a new flag. When Hawaii became the 50th state later that same year, Dettra lost roughly $150,000 in canceled orders and unsalable inventory.2 However, the company quickly recovered when they made and sold roughly 2 million new flags, roughly double what Dettra normally made in a year.3

At its peak, Dettra employed about 150 people and had a large network of roughly 5,000 distributors, retailers, and wholesalers.4 Dettra even had special shops for custom flag and banner designs. They made signals for Frank Sinatra's yacht and pennants for the Seminole Tribe in Florida.5

Flags and banners were tested for durability against wind and sunlight, sometimes even sent to places like Florida and the South Western United States for testing. Depending on where the custormer lived, they would recommend a certain type of fabric. For example, polyester and cotton are more durable, but due to their heavy nature it takes more wind to fly it on a flagpole. Alternatively, nylon is more lightweight and easier to fly. 

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Photo credit: flagguys.com 

In addition to his flag manufacturing company, it appears John Dettra also trimmed hedges at some point in his life. Here is an advertisement for his "little wonder hedge trimmer" invention.6 

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Photo credit: flagguys.com

Based on this instruction manual, it appears that at some point Dettra was once named the Detco Manuafacturing Co. The company was eventually purchased by one of their major competitors, Annin & Co., in 1998.

 

Sources:

1Justia Trademarks. https://trademarks.justia.com/712/47/dettra-flag-products-71247990.html

2 Nilsson, Jeff. “More Than a Flag.” The Saturday Evening Post. June 6, 2009. https://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2009/06/flag-day-history/

3 Kita, Joe. “Stars and Stripes Forever Turning Red, White, and Blue into the Fabric of American Patriotism.” The Morning Call. June 14, 1984. https://www.mcall.com/news/mc-xpm-1984-06-14-2418444-story.html

4 Ibid.

5 Ibid.

6 Flag guys. https://www.flagguys.com/state.html#dettra

Thursday, 13 February 2020 16:42

Flexible Flyer

If you are a snow lover like me, this sled may have you reminiscing snow days from your childhood. This sled was owned by Ethel Mullineaux. We do not have much information about Ethel, but we believe she lived in the Philadelphia and southern Montgomery County area in the early 1900s.

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1971.11533.001 – Flexible Flyer

Made by S.L. Allen Company, this type of sled is known as the Flexible Flyer. Compared to other sleds, the Flexible Flyer became popular for its speed and maneuverability. One downside to this sled, as many of you have probably experienced firsthand, it does not work well in soft, deep snow.

Samuel Allen started his company, S.L. Allen Company, as a farm equipment manufacturing business in 1868. To be close to the railroads and workers, the company was established in Philadelphia. Allen’s Planet Drill (a fertilizer drill) and Planet Junior (a seed drill) were designed to help farmers plant their crops more quickly.

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Samuel Allen, Photo Credit: wikipedia.org

Although Allen’s business was a success, he wanted to provide work for his employees during the summer (farm equipment was only made in the winter so it was ready for sale by the spring). Allen designed several sleds in the 1880s and eventually patented the Flexible Flyer in 1889.

It took a few years to gain momentum, but by the early 1900s Wanamaker’s and other large retailers began selling the Flexible Flyer. In 1915, an estimated 120,000 were sold and nearly 2,000 Flexible Flyers were sold in a single day!

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Photo Credit: Hagley Museum

The company continued to make both farm equipment and Flexible Flyers after Allen’s death in 1918. When the company closed in 1968, the rights to the Flexible Flyer design were sold to Leisure Group. The rights to manufacture this sled have changed hands a few times since then and you can still buy a Flexible Flyer today!

 

Sources:

“It’s All Downhill From Here!: The Iconic Flexible Flyer Sled.” Hagley Museum. January 22, 2018. https://www.hagley.org/librarynews/it%E2%80%99s-all-downhill-here

Masciantonio, Robert. "Flexible Flyer Glides into Obscurity,” Hidden City. Febrary 8, 2016. https://hiddencityphila.org/2016/02/flexible-flyer-factory-glides-into-obscurity/

Thursday, 16 January 2020 16:39

Governor George Howard Earle III

Born on December 5, 1890, George Howard Earle III was a resident of Lower Merion. In his youth, he attended the Delancey School in Philadelphia and later attended Harvard, but never completed his degree.

In 1916, Earle became a lieutenant in the army stationed on the Mexican border. His duty was to prevent raids from Pancho Villa, a Mexican revolutionary and guerrilla leader. His military service continued in World War I when he commanded the U.S.S. Victor. In February 1918, Earle earned the Navy Cross when he helped to save his crew from a fire onboard.

Earle portrati

Photo credit: Capitol Preservation Committee and John Rudy Photography

After his military service, Earle turned his attention to his family’s sugar business and participation in politics. When Franklin D. Roosevelt became President in 1933, Earle switched his political affiliation from Republican to Democrat. President Roosevelt appointed Earle Minister to Austria. Enjoying political life, Earle decided to run for Governor of Pennsylvania.

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Norristown Times Herald, Wednesday November 7, 1934

Earle became Pennsylvania’s 30th Governor in 1935, only the second Democrat to hold the position after the Civil War. During his time as Governor, Earle followed in President Roosevelt’s footsteps by creating a “Little New Deal” for Pennsylvania. He created work projects, many of which focused on parks and historic sites. Some of the projects included: the reconstruction of Pennsbury Manor (William Penn’s summer home) and connecting the Pennsylvania Turnpike from Harrisburg to Pittsburg. He also passed public aid laws such as unemployment compensation, civil rights laws, and support for unions. At this time, Governor Earle was not permitted to run for a second term and thus attempted to become a U.S. Senator in 1938. He ultimately failed.

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Norristown Times Herald, Tuesday, November 6, 1934

After his term as governor ended in 1939, Earle served President Roosevelt again, this time as Minister to Bulgaria. During World War II, it is rumored that Earle served as a spy for President Roosevelt. Of the many stories that arose from this rumor was the story about Earle’s private meeting with Adolf Hitler where he is said to have stated, “I have nothing against the Germans, I just don’t like you.” Earle later presented a plot to capture Hitler, but President Roosevelt declined to proceed with the plan.

After his public service, Earle returned to Pennsylvania. He died in Bryn Mawr on December 30, 1974. He is buried at the Church of the Redeemer in Bryn Mawr.

 

 

Sources:

Dixon, Mark E. “George Earle Paid a Price for Being the Messenger: the Lower Merion resident gave President Roosevelt some unpleasant news on the Soviet massacre.” Main Line Today. http://www.mainlinetoday.com/Main-Line-Today/April-2017/George-Earle-Paid-a-Price-for-Being-the-Messenger/

O’Loughlin, Kathy. “History: PA. Governors with Main Line Ties.” Main Line Times. January 18, 2013. http://www.mainlinemedianews.com/mainlinetimes/life/history-pa-governors-with-main-line-ties/article_24c4b8cc-c31f-5526-b880-43323ac08cc1.html

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Governor George Howard Earle III. http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/portal/communities/governors/1876-1951/george-earle.html

Thursday, 21 November 2019 17:44

Enterprise Manufacturing Company

As we enter the holiday season, many of us will be eating plenty of pies and cakes. For people who enjoy fruit pies and cakes, having a device to remove pits is essential.

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Cherry Pitter, HSMC Collection

This is an example of a cherry pitter, circa late 1800s. It is made from cast iron. The user secures the clamp to a table or counter, places the cherries in the top tray, and moves the crank. One by one, each cherry is moved under the blade, which pushes the pit out from the cherry. We still used pitters today, but they are generally less heavy and easier to use than older models like this.

cherry pitter

Photo Credit: Greater Philadelphia GeoHistory Network and the Free Library of Philadelphia

This particular cherry pitter was manufactured by Enterprise Manufacturing Company. Located in Philadelphia, this company specialized in making hardware products. The company was especially known for their cherry pitters, apple peelers, and coffee mills. 

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Photo Credit: the American Artisan, Volume 71, Issue 3

The company was founded in the 1864 and was located on the corner of Dauphin, 3rd, and American Streets. Enterprise Manufacturing Co. remained in business until 1956 when it was bought by Silex Co.

 

 

Sources:

Paul, Larry R. Made in the Twentieth Century: A Guide to Contemporary Collectibles. (The Scarecrow Press, Inc., Lanham: 2005), page 144.

The American Artisan and Hardware Record, Volume 71, Issue 3. Chicago, 1916. https://books.google.com/books?id=g349AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA6-PA67&lpg=RA6-PA67&dq=when+was+the+enterprise+mfg+co+philadelphia+in+business&source=bl&ots=dH3lyqFBGg&sig=ACfU3U0zf6SrcAJUGciMuAnFtDdyG73dyQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwixrrvV3fvlAhXydd8KHeqgBpAQ6AEwFHoECA0QAQ#v=onepage&q=enterprise%20mfg%20co%20&f=false

“Hexamer General Surveys, Volume 18, Enterprise Manufacturing Co. of Pennsylvania.” Greater Philadelphia GeoHistory Network. https://www.philageohistory.org/rdic-images/view-image.cfm/HGSv18.1660-1661

Around 1:00AM on September 1, 1909, a group of four robbers assaulted an elderly East Norriton cobbler, George A. Johnson, in his home near the intersection of DeKalb Street and Germantown Pike. After being hit on the head and shot, Johnson crawled about a quarter mile to seek help from his neighbor John Steffin. He was taken to Charity Hospital where he recounted the event to Sergeant Macolly. Johnson died the following day at Charity Hospital.

 Norristown Daily Herald September 2, 1909

Norristown Daily Herald, Sept. 2, 1909

The discovery of fake mustaches and a gold piece taken from Johnson’s house lead to the arrest of six men: Frank Chicorine, Nich Maringe, John Ballon, Felix Fare, Frank Paruchi, and Antonio Jacovettie. The first four were involved in Johnson’s murder and the last two had previously attempted to rob Johnson. Fare was found guilty of second degree murder, which earned him 20 years in prison. Chicorine, Maringe, and Ballon were found guilty of first degree murder and were sentenced to hang.

 

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Norristown Daily Herald, Sept. 11, 1909

On June 23, 1910, a crowd of approximately 300 people gathered in front of the Montgomery County prison, even though executions were no longer held publicly. Chicorine and Maringe were hanged inside the prison. Ballon was reprieved by Governor Stuart hours before the execution was to occur. Chicorine and Maringe were falsely informed that Ballon was not present with them because the law only allowed for two people to be hanged at one time. This was claimed to have been done to minimize the potential for an incident as Chicorine was known to have made threats to destroy the prison with dynamite. Chicorine and Maringe were pronounced dead in front of twenty-five witnesses with the cause of death listed as “strangulation.”

 

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These were the hoods and remnants of one of the nooses used in this hanging. If you want to see these artifacts in person, be sure to attend our free Capital Sin program on Thursday November 14, 2019 starting at 7PM.

Milton Jerrold Shapiro was born in Cleveland, Ohio on June 25, 1912. He eventually changed his last name to Shapp to avoid receiving public prejudice for his Jewish faith. After graduating from Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland in 1933, Shapp started an independent sales business for electronics. He moved his business to Philadelphia in 1936 and made his residence in Merion Square, Montgomery County. After serving in World War II, Shapp founded Jerrold Electronics Corporation.

milton jerrold shapp psa sm

Photo credit: Pennsylvania State Archives

Shapp quickly developed a reputation for not only further developing the cable television industry but also his respect for marginalized groups. His company often hired African Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other minority groups. Women even had the opportunity to hold top management positions. Shapp’s reputation aided him in his run for Pennsylvania Governor. Although he lost in 1966, Shapp’s refusal to “lock step with Democratic bosses”[1] resonated with the general public. In 1970, Shapp ran again and became the first Jewish Governor of Pennsylvania.

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Times Herald, November 4, 1970

While in office, Shapp became nationally known for getting opposing groups to work together and making improvements to public services. Some of these improvements included: elderly programs, handicap services, welfare reform, prison reforms, divorce reforms, and tax breaks for smaller businesses. Although Shapp is well known for these improvements, one of his most important contributions is often overlooked.

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Photo credit: Wikipedia

In 1974, Shapp received a letter from gay activist Mark Segal. The two met in Norristown to discuss how to prevent discrimination of people identifying as LGBTQ. After the meeting, Shapp launched a task force to investigate possible solutions. Realizing the State Legislature would not pass state-wide laws preventing discrimination in local communities, Shapp decided to make changes to the State Government itself. On April 23, 1975, Shapp issued an executive order to end discrimination within the Pennsylvania State Government against people based on their “sexual preference”.[2] This was the first time any Governor in the United States made a law protecting members of the LGBTQ community from discrimination.

 


[1] Burton, William. “LGBT History Month: Former PA gov was an unlikely advocate for gay rights.” Wednesday October 10, 2018. The Bay Area Reporter. https://www.ebar.com/news/history/266588

[2] “Pennsylvania Governors: Governor Milton Jerrold Shapp.” Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission.http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/portal/communities/governors/1951-2015/milton-shapp.html

 

 

Thursday, 12 September 2019 17:40

Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker

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Born in Phoenixville in 1843, Samuel Whitaker Pennypacker spent his young adult life studying law. After opening his own law practice in Philadelphia in 1866, Pennypacker explored public service opportunities. He served on the Philadelphia Board of Education and was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia in the late 1880s. In 1902, Pennypacker (Republican) defeated Robert Pattison (Democrat) to become the 23rd Governor of Pennsylvania.

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Campaign Pin for Governor Pennypacker

During his time as Governor, Pennypacker addressed problems created by the industrial revolution. One of these problems was the Coal and Iron Police. Prior to the 20th century, Pennsylvania only had localized sheriffs and police. With the rise in Pennsylvanian manufacturing, companies hired private police to secure their property. However, without oversight, many of these private police were used to combat strikes and other worker disputes. Governor Pennypacker saw these private police as unconstitutional and thus created the Pennsylvania State Police. This statewide police force was one of the first in the United States.

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In addition to the State Police, Governor Pennypacker appointed the first commissioner of forestry and helped to preserve half a million acres of land. He also established the State Museum of Pennsylvania and oversaw the rebuilding of the State Capitol (which later became the subject of a price gouging scandal).

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Book written by Gov. Pennypacker about the PA State Capital. HSMC Collection

One less positive aspect to Governor Pennypacker’s time in office was his poor relationship with the press. Tired of being drawn as a parrot by political cartoonist Charles Nelan, the Governor passed the Salus-Grady law (also known as the anti-cartoon law of 1903). This law banned cartoons that depicted people as animals. According to Governor Pennypacker, the law was designed to make the press more accountable and less driven by newspaper sales. The press claimed the law was a violation of their first amendment rights and proceeded to depict the Governor and other politicians as non-animal objects. The Salus-Grady Bill was ultimately repealed in 1907 after Governor Pennypacker’s term ended.

 

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The law's supporters satirically portrayed as inanimate objects by Walt McDougallPhoto credit: The North American

After his Governorship, Pennypacker returned to practicing law and writing. He died on September 2, 1916 in Schwenksville and is buried in Morris Cemetery.

 

Sources:

Cartoons and Cartoonists: Charles Nelan, “Mutual Admiration,” Philadlephia North American, January 29, 1903. The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/cartoons-and-cartoonists/54992_ca_object_representations_media_109963_full_jpeg/

When Cartoonists Were Criminals. Historical Society of Pennsylvania. https://hsp.org/blogs/fondly-pennsylvania/when-cartoonists-were-criminals

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/portal/communities/governors/1876-1951/samuel-pennypacker.html

Thursday, 08 August 2019 16:08

Chatlin's Charge Card

For much of our history, people used physical currency to purchase goods. However, today we are experiencing an increased use of electronic payments instead of traditional paper and metal currency. This transition can be partly attributed to the emergence of charge accounts in the early twentieth century.

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Times Herald, September 1956

Charge accounts were essentially the first credit cards. Large companies gave their customers an account number and a small metal coin to show to the cashier for each purchase. At the end of the month, the customer would get one bill for all the purchases they made at that store. The picture below shows an example of a Chatlin’s Charge Card.

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Chatlin's Charge Card, HSMC Collection

Russian Jewish immigrants Samuel and Ida Chatlin founded this Norristown department store in 1892. Located at 244-252 East Main Street, Chatlin’s sold a variety of items such as: clothing, tools, and home appliances. To compete with other large stores in the area, Chatlin’s created many charge accounts for their customers.

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Chatlin's Department Store, HSMC Photograph Collection

Upon their retirement in 1926, Samuel and Ida’s son, Morris, took over the family business. When Morris died in 1974, Chatlin’s had no heir willing to continue the family business. Morris’ widow, Cecele (Stein) Morris, originally planned to move the company to Logan Square in 1975. However, by November of 1975, Cecele announced the store would close.

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Times Herald, November 21, 1975

 

Sources:

Jack and Brian Coll, Norristown: Then & Now, Arcadia Publishing: Charleston, SC 2005.

Michael E. Tolle, “What killed downtown? Norristown, Pennsylvania from Main Street to the malls,” 2012.

 

Thursday, 18 July 2019 15:17

The Buckshot War of 1838

We recently put some new paintings on display in our Reading Room at HSMC. One of them is a portrait of former Pennsylvania Governor David Rittenhouse Porter. In 1838, Porter ran against incumbent Governor Joseph Ritner and won by roughly 5000 votes. Porter’s victory shocked the Anti-Masonic Whigs, causing Burrowes (Chairman of the Whig Committee) to demand an investigation of what he believed to be a fraudulent election. Burrowes instructed supporters of Governor Ritner to “treat the election held on the 9th of October as if it had never taken place.”[1]

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Governor David Rittenhouse Porter, HSMC Collection

When the Philadelphia votes were tallied, it was revealed that the legal voting returns from the Northern Liberties District (representing about 5000 voters) were withheld at the request of defeated Democratic candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, Charles J. Ingersoll. He claimed he lost due to voter fraud since the tally books from the sixth and seventh wards were lost.[2] In response to Ingersoll, six of the seventeen voting return judges submitted their own voting results, which favored the Anti-Masonic Whig candidates. As a result, both parties submitted separate voting results on the State House floor and elected their own Speakers for the State House of Representatives.

Similar problems were found in the State Senate. When Senators were denied their seats due to fraudulent voter returns, a crowd of angry onlookers threatened violence against Anti-Mason Whig leaders Burrows, Stevens, and Penrose. This caused the men to flee the State Senate floor by jumping out a window. The Norristown Herald and Free Press and other papers claimed the mob was led by Philadelphia Loco-Focos. [3]

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Norristown Herald and Free Press, December 12, 1838

The scene became increasingly unstable when the PA State Arsenal was taken by Anti-Mason Whig supporters. Governor Ritner called for the PA militia to be sent to Harrisburg to keep the peace. When General Patterson arrived with his troops in Harrisburg, he was asked if he would support Governor Ritner and the Anti-Mason Whig leaders. Patterson proclaimed that “he had not come for political purposes” and would only act if actual physical violence broke out among the angry crowds.[4] Governor Ritner even appealed to President Van Burren to help put an end to the situation in Harrisburg. The President denied Governor Ritner help, deeming the situation as one that must be settled by the State of Pennsylvania. Without a federal supply of troops or ammunititon, Governor Ritner ordered thirteen rounds of buckshot cartridges to be given to the State troops, giving this event its name. 

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Photograph courtesy of Capital Preservation Committee and John Rudy Photography

Ultimately, a group of Anti-Mason Whig Representatives joined their Democratic counterparts, giving the Democrats the majority in the State House of Representatives.[5] This settled the major disputes in the Legislature and allowed Governor Porter to be inaugurated as the ninth Governor of Pennsylvania. 

Sources:

[1]Egle, William Henry, M.D. “The Buckshot War,” The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Vol. XXIII 1899 No. 2, p. 143 https://www.jstor.org/stable/20085847?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents

[2] Norristown Herald and Free Press, October 17, 1838, page 2.

[3] Norristown Herald and Free Press, December 12, 1838, page 2.

[4] Egle, William Henry, M.D. “The Buckshot War,” The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Vol. XXIII 1899 No. 2, p. 151 https://www.jstor.org/stable/20085847?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents

[5] Malawskey, Nick, “Tight election, voter fraud worries, power grab – no, not now, but 175+ years ago,” December 19, 2016, https://www.pennlive.com/news/2016/12/tight_election_voter_fraud_wor.html


Wednesday, 03 July 2019 16:01

Closed for Independence Day

We will be closed tomorrow, July 4, 2019, to celebrate Independence Day. Enjoy this scanned picture of the front page of the July 3, 1976 Times Herald as Montgomery County prepared to celebrate the country's bicentennial!

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Times Herald, July 3, 1976

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