Displaying items by tag: almanacs

Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:18

Almanacs! Almanacs! Almanacs!

housekeepers

Recently, I decided to tackle a part of the stacks that has gone largely untouched in my seven and a half years at the Historical Society – the almanacs. We have hundreds of them from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. These are not the large volumes of facts you might remember from your school library or playing “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” They do not list the monarchs of Britain or world capitals.

These are instead small booklets. They contain the expected information about the phases of the moon, sunrise and sunsets, and the tides. Beyond that they seem to contain whatever the printer felt like adding. Many have household tips, humorous anecdotes, and moral stories.

franklin

We have a mini-almanac published by Franklin. This one contains little extra information and instead left pages blank for notes.

note

Many of the almanacs were created for the general public while others had a specific audience in mind. Today, the Farmers’ Almanac is one of the best-known periodicals, and many of these early American almanacs also focus on agriculture.

townandcountry

But it seems like there was an almanac for everyone:

poultry

poulson

antmason

My personal favorite is the Piratical & Tragical Almanac. It is not an almanac for pirates, but it fills the gaps between the calendars and the weather predictions with stories of pirates, murders, and stagecoach robberies, complete with woodcut illustrations.

pirates

murder

Given the number of almanacs we have and their condition, they must have been consulted often.

Published in Found in Collection