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Displaying items by tag: trolleys

Monday, 18 December 2023 16:56

Horsham Trolleys

For our last blog of 2023, I wanted to share some winter scenes from our photographs collection.

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This collection of photographs depicts trolleys in Horsham. Many of these trolleys are buried in deep snowbanks, but a few of the pictures appear to be taken outside of the winter months. The photographer(s) are not known as there are no markings or signature on these photographs. 

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One of the photographs provides a clear side view of one of the trolleys. The trolley was operated by P.R.T. Co., which we believe was short for the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company. We know it 1909 the company built small freight stations along the Doylestown line. This included one at Hallowell, a village in Horsham. This station was located on Easton Road near Moreland Avenue.

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Published in Found in Collection
Thursday, 03 September 2020 20:19

The Philadelphia and Western

viaduct

Recently, the Historical Society of Montgomery County received a great postcard showing a P&W train crossing the Bridgeport Viaduct over the Schuylkill.

time table

The Philadelphia and Western Railroad was a commuter railroad started in 1902 (as the Philadelphia and Western Railway). It was originally planned to connect to the Western Maryland Railroad at York, but those plans fell through. Trains began running in 1907, and the Norristown line opened in 1912.

Photo081 watermark

The trestle bridge of the P&W was a landmark in Norristown for many years. Sometimes called the “clock bridge,” it was an easy to find place to meet up with people. However, the decline of railroads and trolleys, in the wake of the post-war car boom, led to buses replacing Norristown’s trolleys in 1951. The bridge over Main Street was torn down in 1955.

red arrow

The bridge in the postcard is still in use, however. In 1954, the company was sold to the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company, and it became known as the Red Arrow Line. Eventually, it became part of SEPTA’s Norristown High Speed Line.

Published in Found in Collection